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Finding Emily

Beyond the doorway, brilliant colour caught my eye and I headed there like a bee to a flower. The brushstrokes, the colours, the energy drew me in. If this had been the only painting I saw at the Art Gallery of Ontario, I would have been satisfied.

I had discovered Emily Carr.

It isn’t like I didn’t know who she was and the place she holds in Canadian culture before that moment. But this? This was something different. She got “inside”.

Emily Carr, Trees in the Sky
Trees in the Sky, Emily Carr, 1939

After returning home to Nova Scotia, I kept thinking about that painting and the woman who created it but life kept me busy. Then…I became ill. (I wonder now if it wasn’t God saying, “This is important. You need to stop and look at what I’m showing you!”)

For two weeks, about all I could do was lie in bed, sleep and read so I went looking for a book about Emily Carr, only to discover she was also a gifted writer. I could get to know her through her own words. And as I read, she began to teach me.

When someone’s name becomes a household word, we often forget the struggle and work they put in before their recognition by the world. Emily didn’t attain success until she was in her late 50’s. She even gave up painting for 15 years while she earned a living. Her autobiography “Growing Pains” introduced me to the journey she took.

However, it’s in her journal, “Hundreds and Thousands” that I really got to know her. Because she never meant her journals for publication, she wrote to herself and there’s an informal honesty in the words. Reading them felt like sitting at the kitchen table, sharing a coffee with her and chatting about creativity and what it took for her to make art.

For instance, she offers this advice:

I took always in my sketch-sack a little notebook. When I had discovered my subject, I sat before it for some while before I touched a brush, feeling my way into it, asking myself these questions, What attracted you to this particular subject? Why do you want to paint it? What is its core, the thing you are trying to express?

Now I find myself writing in my own journal more, becoming mindful of the subjects I choose. I ask myself bigger questions about things that catch my eye and look beyond the surface. I’ve already come up with some answers that have surprised and delighted me.

This next quote also jumped out at me. After reading it, I closed the book to let it sink in.

Inspiration is intention obeyed.

I can’t say exactly why that quote strikes me so deeply. Perhaps it’s because moving to Nova Scotia now feels like an inspired decision but it began as an intention to live simply and creatively. I’m still peeling back the layers of those words and I suspect there will be at least one more blog post about it.

Her work inspires me but not because I want to copy her style. Rather it was her search to find her own way I connect with. I want to put more of me into my work. Emily agrees.

Another’s thoughts are not ours and to copy them gives no growth. Be careful you do not write or paint anything that is not your own, that you don’t know in your own soul.

Like a great teacher, her words challenge me to ask myself, “What do I need to learn here?”

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By the Bay

Back to my sketching today.

I intended to do one of a scene I shared this morning on Instagram but this was the view when I sat down in my studio to sketch.

I mean, how could I not?

I pencilled in a rough outline first because I often start too big and don’t capture what I want. Pencil first helped with that.

Then I picked out the important bits with my trusty Pigma Micron (love those pens). The watercolours are from my Winsor & Newton travel set, mostly using cobalt blue, ultramarine blue, burnt sienna and raw sienna.

I like the blue into the cliffs for shadows because I’m focusing on deeper colour. When I looked back over my first sketches I wasn’t satisfied with the colour. Too washed out. I find myself drawn to other people’s sketches with pops of colour. So obviously it’s something that speaks to me. Time to stop playing safe.

Right now the outside world is still pretty gray and brown and it has a definite influence on my palette. I may have to really let loose and make it up as I go!

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Creating my own sunshine

Yesterday was another rainy, overcast day and all I wanted to do was hibernate until the sky turns blue again. So I looked at the forecast for the next 14 days.

8 days of rain!

I may end up covered in moss if I stand still too long, so I fought off the hibernation urge. Instead, I finished moving (see what I did there) back into my summer studio where the light is wonderful. Not quite summer sunshine but at least there’s a glow. All of which helps lift the mood.

After I finished putting things away, I completed a painting and still had some time to spare. So I did today’s sketch sitting by one of the studio windows, overlooking my neighbour’s place. Wish I could show you the inside with its driftwood furniture. Cute as can be.

Because I’m the artist and I get to make up the rules, I painted a summer day, complete with sunshine and wild roses.

Ahh. That feels better.

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Cloudy with a chance of red doors

Today is raining and overcast. Too many folks on a flood watch right now but here in Margaretsville we’re okay. Most of our water drains into the Bay of Fundy, which means the waterfalls are spectacular along the cliffs.

This time of year the whole landscape seems grey and brown. The one spot of colour is the red door on the Art Shack down by the dock which I can see from my studio. Unless the sun comes out. Then the bay and sky become a brilliant blue. Here on the Bay a “Blue Day” is a good day. But for today, it’s the red door that calls to me.

I used my Daniel Smith colours for this sketch.

  • Payne’s Blue Gray is perfect for overcast skies and bay.
  • Their Pompeii Red and English Red Ochre worked well for the ironwork along the edge of the dock. 
  • Peryline Scarlet for the door. 
  • Lots of others as I experimented but the surprise for me was Buff Titanium. Perfect for the cement barrier at the head of the wharf.

Day two of the sketch book practice completed.

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Daniel Smith inspired my sketching practice


” They’re funny things, accidents. You never have them till you’re having them.”

Winnie the Pooh

Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I receive an affiliate commission at no extra cost to you. All opinions remain my own.

I love happy “accidents” that lead to something unexpected and wonderful. When I was in Toronto teaching last week, I visited the local art supply store (of course) and discovered a dot colour chart of Daniel Smith watercolours – dots of paint you can actually use. Finding it was my happy accident.

Because I’ve been reading a lot of rave reviews for Daniel Smith watercolours, I grabbed a set. Though too busy to paint while teaching, I’d look at those pretty dots of colour in the evenings. I decided they would be the genesis of the daily sketching practice I’ve been talking about. So when I got home, I dug out the small journal from Global Art I’d bought for this purpose, my Escoda travel brush and got down to it.

Sketch of orchids in my studio window
Sketch of orchids in my studio window

I’ve decided to paint whatever catches my eye on a particular day. In other words, not to stress about the subject – which I often do and it usually stops me from doing anything. These orchids in my studio caught my eye so I pulled up a chair and started with a line sketch using a Sakura Pigma Micron 05 black marker. I like the fine line it makes and the ink is fade proof and water proof.

Then I got out those new Daniel Smith colours and had a ball trying them out. I tried to write down the colours as I used them but I admit to getting carried away by the process. I kept it fast and loose because I love the energy of a ‘sketchy’ piece and it loosens me up for ‘serious’ painting.

I used:

  • Deep Sap Green for the leaves . Definitely a new favourite green. It’s gorgeous!
  • English Red Ochre – perfect for the clay pot
  • Van Dyke Brown for the smaller pot
  • Pthalo Yellow Green for the underlying tint to the orchids
  • Rose Madder Permanent for the overlying tint
  • Bordeaux for the veining (Another bewitching colour I will be using more of)
  • Antraquinoid Red for the the lip. I don’t have another good word to describe how beautiful this colour is.

I have to say I love the Daniel Smith colours so far. Rich with lots of pigment. You’ll be seeing more of them soon.

The Materials I Used

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Mothers Day 2019 Open House

Mother's Day Open House 2019

Looking for something special to share with Mom this year?

Take a drive up to Margaretsville and enjoy our Open Studio Event

Sunday, May 12, 2019 – 10 am to 4 pm, Admission is free

11 Seaman St. , Margaretsville, Nova Scotia

Watch for the signs as you come into town.

Meet the three different artists who will be creating, making and sharing. Ask lots of questions. We love them!

Enjoy some refreshments and conversation while you learn more about each artist and their work. There will also be an opportunity to pick up a gift for Mom or register for a summer workshop.

Original Watercolour, Hidden Treasure

Aprille Janes

Watercolour Artist

Aprille has fond childhood memories of outdoor adventures and summer days spent on the water. Today, her art reflects this love of nature and she divides her time between painting, and teaching watercolour workshops.

Original Beaded Bracelet

Barbara Hunter

Bead Artist / Altered Clothing

Barbara fulfilled every crafter’s dream when she opened Bear’s Beads in Cobourg,  Ontario. Now retired and living in Nova Scotia, she continues to indulge in her passion for beads…and a few other crafty endeavors.

A selection of papercrafted art

Wanda Hillier

Papercrafting Artist

Since discovering the beautifully designed paper called cardstock, Wanda has been making greeting cards and photo albums, wedding guest books and decorated note pads. In fact, paper has found a place in nearly every room in her house!

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11 Inspirational Quotes for a Working Artist

Artists must express their lives

Inspiration comes and goes. Creativity is the result of practice.

Phil Cousineau

Always dream and shoot higher than you know you can do. Don’t bother to just be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.

William Faulkner

Have fun, even if it’s not the same kind of fun everyone else is having.

C.S. Lewis

The one thing you have that nobody else has is you. Your voice, your mind, your story, your vision. So write and draw and build and play and dance and live as only you can.

Neil Gaiman

Recognizing power in another does not diminish your own.

Joss Whedon

It’s not just about creativity. It’s about the person you’re becoming while you’re creating.

Charlie Peacock

Stay loyal to your creativity because it’s a gift.

Pharrell

Doubt is part of the creative process.

Danielle LaPorte

If you ask me what I came to to in this world, I, an artist, will answer you: I am here to live out loud.

Emile Zola

Things that excite you aren’t random. They are connected to your purpose. Follow them.

Unknown

I always get to where I am going by walking away from where I have been.

Winnie the Pooh
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My Cure for Procrastination

Art is inevitable

Stop in the middle. Never stop working at the natural barriers. The next time you start working, the barrier will be the first thing you encounter, and you won’t have the momentum to overcome it. — Ernest Hemingway

Procrastination wasn’t a word I applied to myself. My husband would second that because if something needs doing, I can’t rest until it’s done. However, I did have a hard time getting on track again once I completed a painting. It wasn’t because I was putting it off but more because I didn’t know where to start.

Back when I taught creative writing I always mentioned Hemingway’s process to my students as sound advice to help them avoid the quicksand of creative procrastination. Knowing what you want to write next keeps the ‘juice’ flowing. I just never applied it to my painting process until now. Talk about tunnel vision!

Cure Procrastination. Have lots on the go

Up until a few weeks ago, I worked on one piece at a time. I called it “focus” but now I see it created a natural barrier to the next piece. When I finished a painting, it took me a few days to find my next subject and face the blank sheet of paper. Flailing about, trying to decide on “What next?” is my version of creative procrastination. It frustrated the heck out of me.

I don’t remember exactly what inspired me to start 3-4 pieces at the same time but I will be forever grateful to the Muse for that whisper in my ear.

Since that AHA moment, I look forward to getting to my studio each day. Knowing what I’m going to work on feels liberating. Spread across the two tables where I paint are pieces in different stages so I can always find a place to start. I also keep a list of ideas and reference photos tacked up over my table. Also, working in a series helps. As I finish a piece, I choose something, start the sketch and do my colour tests.

I’ve completed a number of pieces in the last few weeks because of my “new” habit. It’s also why I haven’t posted on the blog for awhile. I’ve been too busy in the studio!

Found a fix for your procrastination habit? Please, share it in the comments and spread the word.

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Take Time To Enjoy the Gift

The artist is nothing without the gift, but the gift is nothing without work. – Emile Zola

Time away is a gift

This year, being away for a whole month was a first for both of us.

A month changes things, providing distance and perspective. It made me see I was in danger of filling my schedule with things that took me away from what I really wanted. Putting together a program to help artists find time was keeping me too busy to paint.

How’s that for irony?

So I took a deep breath, slowed down and asked,

2019 Planner“What do I really want in 2019?”

Easy. I want to prioritize my painting.

That means committing to a daily practice of drawing and painting, taking time to be a student and making my art a priority rather than an afterthought. Like practicing daily scales, I need to put in the work.

We all have our own ways of bringing our dreams to life, but what we do each day, at a ‘right here, right now’ level, will determine whether we get there.  — Tara Leaver, Artist

And, as we all know, for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. When I say “Yes” to something then I must say “No” to something else.

“What is necessary and what is distraction?”

When I arrived back home I began making time for my dreams by looking at the “mental clutter” I had allowed into my life. Like physical clutter, it took up space, made it hard to navigate and gathered dust.

I don’t know about you, but I tend to subscribe to things as I’m browsing because they catch my eye or I want their ‘freebie’ or there’s a program I’m interested in. That means I end up on a lot of lists if I’m not careful.

Now I looked at each and every promotion and update that came through my inbox and held it up for scrutiny.

  1. Did I even sign up for this? Even with all the anti-spam laws, I still get added to lists without my permission. Those are an easy decision. Unsubscribe.
  2. Is this information pertinent to me anymore? More often than not the answer was No because my life has changed so much. Unsubscribe.
  3. When was the last time I read the information this sender provides? If I can’t even remember – unsubscribe.

Now I’ll admit that unsubscribing sometimes felt a little like breaking up. Often they ask “Why” and it’s tempting to write “It’s not you, it’s me”. Mostly though, I skip giving a reason unless the sender is a friend in the real world.

This is an ongoing process but the difference in less than a week was phenomenal. My inbox holds only those things I deem important to me personally or to my renewed focus on the painting.

the gift of mental decluttering
And speaking of distractions…

Where do I want to invest time on social platforms? Do I have a reason for being there?

For me, it boils down to Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest, which make sense to me as a visual artist. I deleted my profile on LinkedIn because I’m not in the corporate/business world any longer. The jury is still out about Twitter.

I left a number of Facebook groups because I wasn’t interacting or they belonged to a different phase of my life. My Creative Fire Café , of course, stays put. I love the community we created and what we learn from each other. The social aspect of Facebook is also a gift because it keeps me in touch with family and friends.

Gift of Changing “The way it’s always been”the gift of studio time

The “Yes” part means daily time in my studio, painting and learning. In the past, I held a belief that my creative time “had” to be in the morning. And yet, I easily slipped into an afternoon routine which feels natural.

By taking care of a few things each morning such as social media, my coaching practice and biz admin (and yes, household chores) I relax and totally focus on my art in the afternoons. Up to now, I hadn’t even recognized that feeling of “something’s not done” and the pressure it created to hurry through my painting time.

Now the parent part of my brain says “Right. Chores are done. Go play.”

I am here to do more than just complete a To Do list. Click To Tweet

The gift of self care via a dog

Gift of Self-Care

At the end of my studio time, right on the dot of 4:00, Joey the Dog comes in, sits down and stares hard at me. He’s letting me know in no uncertain terms, it’s time for his walk. It’s like having my own personal trainer.

These days I find myself taking longer walks which means more fresh air and exercise. Because my other priorities now have their place, I am free to enjoy the moment plus the exercise loosens me up after sitting for so long. When I get back to the house, my husband and I have a cup of tea and spend some quiet time together.

Without even trying, I’m practicing better self-care and enjoying quality time with the spouse, a precious gift.

The Sum of the Equation

All of these small changes add up. Fast. I see positive growth in my art which translates into feeling relaxed and happy, knowing my dreams are getting daily attention. I even sleep better. My time is being spent on priorities, not busy work.

What strategies have worked for you when it comes to finding more time to focus on your priorities?